Gallimaufry

Yep, it’s time for another post of random junk clogging up my inbox. I e-mail myself all sorts of links for possible blog posts. Since Loose Ends and Subway Surface (from this Friday Streets of Glasgow) are taking up two of my three or four posts a week, posts about other things get squeezed out. Hence posts like these with a jumble of different ideas, a gallimaufry, in fact.

First is a recent story from the East Lothian Courier about how North Berwick is one of the twenty most charming towns in Scotland, alongside Anstruther, Broughty Ferry, Crieff, Cromarty, Falkirk, Fort William, Kelso, Kirkcudbright, Millport, Oban, Pitlochry, Pittenweem, Plockton, Portree, St Andrews, Stornoway, Stromness, Tobermory and Ullapool. Apparently NB is on the list due to the birdlife and golf courses around and about. No arguments from me, even with the golf. What struck me when I saw this list is some of the surprising choices on it. I’ve been to fifteen of them and I wouldn’t say Falkirk or Fort William are really that charming. Falkirk in particular has a pleasant town house and Callander House is okay plus the Kelpies but it is a bit of a hole apart from that. Fort William is rank too, its only saving grace that any possible direction the road takes you leads to somewhere much nicer, Mallaig, Glenfinnan, Loch Ness or Glencoe.

A memorial garden to victims of the Irish and Highland famines was recently unveiled outside the People’s Palace. When I went by there the other day, the cleanup after the Transmt music festival was still in progress so I couldn’t go get a good look. The helpful People’s Palace directed me to an upstairs window where I could see the garden and to the Winter Gardens where there was an interesting, informative and reasoned display about why the garden was there. I hope to get back for a closer look in the next few weeks. It is thoroughly appropriate that it is there, long overdue perhaps, and done in a sensitive but powerful way.

The East Lothian Courier yielded another article about a statue of an archer that has been put up recently by the river Esk in Musselburgh. Apparently it will be part of a larger arrow trail around Musselburgh relating to various major events in the town’s past including Roman settlements, battles and the Silver Arrow competition which dates from 1603. I hope to get there soon. I like imaginative public art like that.

In fashion news, there was a story on the BBC News website that tight swimming trunks are the least popular garment in Britain. I don’t do Speedos, you’ll be glad to hear. Other unpopular items include in order leather trousers (don’t like them), Crocs (or them though I believe they are popular in hospitals because they clean up good), flares (distress), clothes with elbow patches (yup), tracksuit (in context, fine), red trousers (check out the New Town Flaneur account on Twitter for red breeks capers), Uggs (whatever), deep v-neck T-shirts (anything that shows chest hair is too much for me) and sweater vests (don’t do them – too thick). I would also add jeans with holes in them. I absolutely hate them. Why pay a fortune for something that happens anyway? If you want ventilation, put on shorts.

And finally a nice story from the Edinburgh Evening News of a primary school pupil who has brought about friendship benches in her school playground where lonely kids can sit and other kids can go and befriend them. The benches were made by the charity Scottish War Blinded. I can’t be cynical about stuff like this, I just think that’s great. All power to Alix.

Anyway, enough of this. Easter Road West also has a post much like this one tonight though that one covers the campaign to provide female sanitary products in football grounds, as well as autism and old football grounds. That’s my inbox clearer for just now, until the next time.

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7 thoughts on “Gallimaufry

  1. We were actually at the famine monument this afternoon! I first went looking for it a few weeks ago when they were setting up TRNSMT, not realising how far the cordoned off area extended. It will probably appear in the next Gallivanting post. We had to wait ages for three kids to stop playing on the upturned boat before we could get pictures. There’s nothing to say you can’t climb on it, but it seems a bit disrespectful to me (on the parents’ part).

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Digest: July 2018 – Walking Talking

  3. Pingback: Idea catharsis; or the unfinished articles memorial post | Wednesday's Child

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