Digest: July 2018

July 2018’s Digest comes after another busy month with a few adventures, the return of the football and me now just finished a week’s leave.

Sunday 1st July saw me in Kirkcaldy, a notion just to get on a bus taking me to my favourite art gallery, which had a very fine exhibition of paintings from the Edinburgh School, Anne Redpath, William Gillies and others.

That Saturday took me across an Orange walk onto a train to Dunbar. It was a warm day in my home town and I proceeded to walk for miles and miles, going out across the golf course to Barns Ness lighthouse, a place I had seen frequently on social media photographs recently and from my window in times past. Masochism led me up Doon Hill, written about here, stopping every few yards to wipe sweat from my face, and I looked across Dunbar and the Forth on the way up. I sat at the top for a bit, avoiding a tour group, and looked down towards Torness and St. Abbs Head. My way back into Dunbar took me to Deer Park cemetery, a place of familiar names, relatives, friends and others I’ve known or known of. I sat for a bit under the Prom, looking towards the Bass and scribbling notes in the sunshine. I ended up at Belhaven standing on the beach with my thoughts awhile before I turned back, eventually dining on a chippy by the harbour.

The next day the Hibs were back. Engineering works meant I took the bus to and from the capital, reading along the way the mountaineer Cameron McNeish’s autobiography. From the bus station I undertook a Streets of Glasgow walk on Killermont Street.

That Thursday the Hibs were playing again. On the way to the stadium I walked down through the New Town, an old psychogeographic haunt.

The Friday was my day off and I went to the Glasgow Women’s Library. I had a couple of books to donate plus I had decided to write about the GWL for Loose Ends here on the blog. I ended up joining the library and came away with a book plus pleased to see a Muriel Spark exhibition in progress. I then walked all the way along London Road for Streets of Glasgow, a very long walk but a varied and interesting one. Earlier I took in St. Mary’s Church in the Calton for a future blog post.

A week or so later, I found myself on the bus to Ayr, heading for the Bachelors’ Club in Tarbolton. It was diverting and interesting. The view from the M77 coming back to Glasgow was a major highlight of the day.

The next day I went to Coldstream to watch a Hibs XI rout the locals. On the way I had a few minutes in Berwick – I need to get back there soon – and spent a while wandering around Coldstream between buses. Another Loose Ends post resulted from that walk.

That Thursday Hibs were playing and I went through to Edinburgh a little early on that beautiful sunny day for a walk through the Meadows then Holyrood Park. I ate my fast food watching the ducks and swans in Lochend Park.

The following day I went out on an adventure with my favourite little people around Glasgow on an open top bus.

Sunday 29th was wet and involved a day trip by car, including Dunfermline Carnegie Library and Kirkcaldy Galleries, as well as a walk along the Prom at Portobello and thereafter at Port Seton where we had an unbelievably good fish supper. The nicest weather came when I got back to Glasgow.

I was off the next week and on Tuesday 31st I went to Newcastle via Carlisle. In the hour I had to kill in Carlisle, I made sure I got to the underpass between Tullie House and Carlisle Castle which is a pleasant display of industrial objects and a stone bearing a curse made by the Bishop of Glasgow against the Border Reivers. Newcastle was in the midst of the Great Exhibition of the North and the Grey Monument bore some superb egalitarian slogans. When I discovered that this was part of the Great Exhibition of the North, I was very glad my taxes were going towards it. Better that than Trident. I went over to Gateshead to the Baltic which had two very good exhibitions, one of which was Our Kisses are Petals by Lubaina Himid which featured African-inspired banners with interesting phrases on them. My favourite was ‘Much Silence Has A Mighty Noise’. The other cracking exhibition was Idea Of North which included a mixture of stuff including a display of photographs of people in North Eastern England by various female photographers, a dome talking about sustainable building materials, a poem by Sean O’Brien and WN Herbert, and a display about TyneDeck, a 1960s modernist utopian proposal for the quayside outside the Baltic. Leaving aside my Scottishness bristling against Newcastle being considered ‘north’ (in England, yes, in these islands, goodness no), I liked it a lot. Make sure you get there, if you can.

Anyway, that’s July. August has started fine. I was off work until yesterday. I went on some adventures, did family stuff.

The next post here might be tomorrow, I’m not sure yet. There will definitely be one on Friday, a Streets of Glasgow post, to be precise, featuring London Road. Loose Ends: Coldstream is on Sunday.

August involves this blog’s third anniversary. This is the blog’s 492nd post, remarkably. I haven’t quite managed to put my idea for the 500th post into practice, yet. I don’t have long. If anyone has any ideas or suggestions for future posts, please feel free to share them.

Thanks as ever to all readers, commenters and followers. It’s been quite a ride so far. Cheers just now. Enjoy the rest of your August.

Posts this month –

Loose Ends: National Museum of Scotland

Digest: June 2018

Daisies

Subway Surface: St. Enoch-Kinning Park

Loose Ends: Dunfermline

My favourite bench

Doon Hill

Subway Surface: Kinning Park-Govan

Loose Ends: Abbotsford

Gallimaufry

Subway journey

Streets of Glasgow: Drury Street

Loose Ends: Glasgow Women’s Library

The Joyful Kilmarnock Blues

Travelling books

Streets of Glasgow: Killermont Street

Loose Ends: Bachelors’ Club

2 thoughts on “Digest: July 2018

  1. Pingback: I just don’t think you understand… – Easter Road West

  2. Pingback: Digest: August 2018 – Walking Talking

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