Streets of Glasgow: John Knox Street

I had seen John Knox Street from the Necropolis and knew that it had to be the next part of the Streets of Glasgow series. I wasn’t quite sure where it started, the junction of Castle Street and High Street being joined with Cathedral Square. John Knox Street began with the Cathedral Square Hotel, a red sandstone castle-style building complete with a turret. A car passed me blaring Florence and the Machine and just then the rain started, starting gentle, a drizzly, smelly rain then it got heavier. There were still hints of blue sky over the Necropolis even as the rain fell.

To the right were more modern housing blocks, 1960s-style particularly nearer Duke Street. To the left was the Drygate Brewery, which I hadn’t heard of before but seems to have started just after the Commonwealth Games in 2014 in an old carpet factory. I don’t keep up with brewing news. What I was interested in was the palms leading up to the Drygate, a strange sight in the heart of the city. They can more often be seen by the sea, either east or up in Ullapool, but it was weird in Glasgow.

Soon, as the rain grew heavier, I reached Duke Street and the end of another walk. It hadn’t made me think much of John Knox but that was okay. I like that there are quite a few historically named streets in Glasgow, like Regent Moray Street near Kelvingrove or the whole wheen of Mary, Queen of Scots related streets in the south side. It is a valuable reminder of the history that is always around us, even when we don’t realise it or the surroundings don’t suggest even a hint of a past.

Thank you for reading. Streets of Glasgow returns next week with two posts, including a very special one.

This is the fortieth Streets of Glasgow post here on Walking Talking. Nearby streets written about in this series previously include High Street, Cathedral Street and Duke Street.

5 thoughts on “Streets of Glasgow: John Knox Street

  1. Pingback: Digest: August 2018 – Walking Talking

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