Streets of Glasgow: Clyde Street

a street sign saying Clyde St. on the wall of a building.
Clyde Street: a street sign saying Clyde St. on the wall of a building.
Clyde Street suspension bridge: looking up at an archway with suspension cables extending left and right.
An orange and black mural with the letters Black Lives Matter.
An orange and black mural with the letters Black Lives Matter.
A pub in front of a market building. On the black walls of the pub are illustrations of various people, including a man with a face mask at the top.
A pub in front of a market building. On the black walls of the pub are illustrations of various people, including a man with a face mask at the top.

An autumn afternoon saw me back in the city centre with a few minutes to fit in a couple of Streets of Glasgow, the first right by the mighty river Clyde. I walked along from the Broomielaw and realised that not only were there pavement works on Clyde Street, I would also have to run across the road on the Glasgow Bridge as there isn’t a pedestrian crossing at that side. Once safe on the other side, I started along Clyde Street. Folk sat by the river in the crisp autumnal sunshine, some chatting, others ensconced in their phones or their books. Two polis officers patrolled and soon headed across the bridge with purpose. The Clydeside is changing as ever with construction works on Clyde Street and at the other side with a huge office development continuing even in these times. A wall was adorned with the words ‘Black Lives Matter’, another sign of our times. Further along, the murals by the Clutha had changed. Charles Rennie Mackintosh was adorned with a face mask, other faces newly painted, a girl with sparkly glasses, a neon figure, another with the words of Burns’ Ae Fond Kiss around her. I like them, probably even more than the well-kent faces who were there before.

The Briggait is one of my favourite buildings in Glasgow, an old fish market with sphinxes and arches and elaborations about the place. It was looking particularly fine as I passed, as did the St. Andrew’s Cathedral a little way behind, reflecting in the glass frontage of the offices beside it. I hadn’t looked at the railway before, the sides almost fortified with a tower on either side. It was very fine and reminded me of Perth, which I had visited a couple of weeks previously, where the railway is raised as it passes between the station and the Tay. An old building was now student flats with trousers and washing hanging out the window to dry in the sun. It was a fine day to be out, right enough, a nice, light walk through the heart of the big city.

Thanks for reading. This is the seventy fifth Streets of Glasgow post here on Walking Talking. Other nearby streets which have appeared here previously include Argyle Street and Oswald Street, Dixon Street (which will appear here in two weeks time) and the Broomielaw, which was part of Intercity. Other instalments of Streets of Glasgow can be found on the Streets of Glasgow page.

Here the blog will pause for a hiatus until Wednesday 21st October. Streets of Glasgow: Dixon Street will be here then. Until then, keep safe.

11 thoughts on “Streets of Glasgow: Clyde Street

  1. I finally visited Central London this week, having not been since March, and I was surprised by how many new murals I found too, especially around South Bank; mainly of people, especially NHS workers. There were also some poems about lockdown, which I enjoyed reading (apparently the result of a competition I hadn’t heard about). It’s nice being able to walk around city centres again after being away for so long, although I suspect we may not be able to again in the near future!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: Streets of Glasgow: Dixon Street – Walking Talking

  3. Pingback: Streets of Glasgow: King Street – Walking Talking

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