Streets of Glasgow: King Street

King Street: a street sign on the side of a building stating that it is King Street.​
King Street: a street sign on the side of a building stating that it is King Street.
King Street: a quiet city street with light from windows reflecting on the road in the sunshine.​
King Street: a quiet city street with light from windows reflecting on the road in the sunshine.

May has been particularly cool in Glasgow, the weather perhaps reflecting the news and the world around us. It felt particularly good therefore to go into town on a sunny spring morning and even better to turn into King Street as the sun was in my eyes on the Trongate. A bar called Super Bario stood near the corner – the east coast person in me thought ‘barry’, meaning good, rather than about a certain Italian plumber. I missaw Treasure Bunker, which sells medals and miltary stuff, and thought it was Pleasure Bunker, which would possibly sell other products for other purposes. The Glasgow Print Studio had a John Byrne exhibition on with a rather cool drawing in the window featuring two men, one clearly Byrne with cigarette poking out his mouth. The City retro fashion shop looked quite retro in itself while Streetlevel Photoworks featured up–to-date posters for actual events, which was reassuring in the midst of Level 3 restrictions, including a poster saying BAM! in a comic book font. Bam of course has another meaning in Scotland but there weren’t any kicking around King Street that morning. Well-put phrases were happening around me, Social Rescluse had in its window ‘Better Stop Dreaming Of The Quiet Life Cause It’s The One We’ll Never Know’, which seems about right, while an advertising agency across the way talked of the ‘community of ideas’. I crossed the road and the street opened up with a car park to the right and just before it some quite psychedelic tiles in front of a phone cabinet with an open door. Far out. The Billy Connolly mural by the aforementioned John Byrne stood high to the right as I walked towards a railway bridge and the end of King Street as it joined the Bridgegate. Some graffiti encouraged people to take a look and I had been doing just that around a cool corner of this ever-changing city.

Thanks for reading. This is the eighty-fifth Streets of Glasgow walk to appear here on Walking Talking. Other nearby streets which have featured here include Trongate, Argyle Street, Clyde Street and Parnie Street, which will be here next week. The complete Streets series can be found on its very own page.

3 thoughts on “Streets of Glasgow: King Street

  1. Pingback: Streets of Glasgow: Parnie Street – Walking Talking

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