Streets of Glasgow: Wishart Street

Wishart Street: A white and black street sign on a lamppost.
Wishart Street: A white and black street sign on a lamppost.
Wishart Street with Glasgow Cathedral to the right and the Bridge of Sighs ahead: looking towards a bridge with trees to the left and right. A church tower, spire and end are to the right.
Wishart Street with Glasgow Cathedral to the right and the Bridge of Sighs ahead: looking towards a bridge with trees to the left and right. A church tower, spire and end are to the right.

Wishart Street started at the junction with Alexandra Parade where a big advertising screen did its stuff for capitalism. I bristled at the advert for clothes featuring the cast of Love Island, a group of people not known for wearing many of them, and not for the first time resented that perhaps maybe, just maybe, people could celebrate personality and not just how people look. As I walked I thought about George Wishart, the Protestant reformer who I thought the street was named after. I knew he had been executed in the 1540s but it was only when I got home that I realised it was 1546. I sometimes get my Protestant reformers confused. The back of the Royal Infirmary stretched out to my right, the more modern maternity wing followed by the 19th century main hospital. Folk were getting picked up and dropped off. Babies were probably born as I passed but I was very much in the present. Colourful posters called for power tae the key workers and I have no argument on that score. An old sign on a lamppost declared this area a risk for thieves or so said Strathclyde Police sponsored by the Glasgow Angling Centre, quite a combination. Gold-topped railings started and the Necropolis started to my left, graves and memorials at the bottom of the hill. I thought it was an attractive, secluded place to have a grave. A memorial to William Wallace stood on its own further on and I had another reminder of the Bell o’ the Brae, the street that used to be at the other side of the Cathedral. The Council grass cutters had been out in the Necropolis as the grass was strewn with cuttings and leavings. Joy. I had only seen Wishart Street from the Bridge of Sighs before and there it stood before me, an elegant passage from the city to the Necropolis. The lights underneath weren’t lit since it was the middle of the day. As I came to the junction, I felt cheered up by my walk on a street mainly dominated by stuff around it, the beginnings of life as well as its ending.

Thanks for reading. This is the ninety ninth Streets of Glasgow walk here on Walking Talking. Nearby streets featured here include Alexandra Parade, Duke Street, Castle Street, High Street and John Knox Street, as well as Ladywell Street which will be here next week. That’s the 100th Streets of Glasgow walk here next week. The other 99 are listed on the Streets of Glasgow page.

4 thoughts on “Streets of Glasgow: Wishart Street

  1. Alli Templeton

    Really enjoyed this one, Kev. Having studied Medieval and Early Modern Scotland, I get my Protestant reformers confused too, even more so as the Wishart I am most familiar with is Bishop Wishart, prominent supporter of Robert I – well before the Reformation! And I had to smile at your swipe at Love Island, which I completely agree with. It’s an endless source of annoyance to me that these days, a) TV has become so dummed down, and b) that people are so wordlessly shallow and obsessed with their appearance that how they look seems to be all that matters. There’s something fundamentally wrong with a world that thinks like that.

    Liked by 1 person

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